Rogue
Event

Favor. Gambit.

Cost: 0.
Test Icons:

Look at another investigator's hand. You may play a non-weakness card in that investigator's hand, under your control. If you do, you and that investigator each draw 1 card.

"Yeah, yeah, sure. That's what you said the last 3 times."
James Hall
Before the Black Throne #319.
"You owe me one!"
Reviews

Seems like quite an interesting card with a lot of interactions and not totally clear rules for me, which I hope to clarify here. First of all, it's a Roguish version of Teamwork, but with some advantages. Disadvantages are also present, but they seem pretty minor to me. Let's talk about obvious advantages:

  1. An awesome card in terms of action economy. 0-lvl, 0 cost. You trade one action, which is normally used to play one of your card, to play a card of your mate and to get two cards for the team. Unlike above mentioned Teamwork, it also gives something (two additional cards), not only provides distribution of already existed goodies among players.
  2. Rogues are the richest faction, so it allows to save some resources for poorer mates, while providing the same benefit for the team. E.g. Guardian's Agency Backup: it may totally devastate a guardian, yet can relatively easily be played by many Rogues.
  3. You can support your character's archetype with a card you normally cannot include in your deck. I haven't thought much about it, but Dark Horse for Leo Anderson or some cool weapon for Finn crossed my mind. And now regarding not very clear moments.
  4. "To play a card under you control". Obviously, you cannot play a skill card, and it is clear with assets. But what does it mean to play an event card under your control? Just to apply its effect on yourself instead of the owner? It seems like this card allows to play events as well, doesn't it?
  5. Attacks of opportunity. I read it as even though you're gonna play a card from your mate's hand which doesn't trigger an attack of opportunity (e.g. Dynamite Blast (2), you will get it because the initial event does provoke it and you apply an attack of opportunity before applying the effect of the card. If you play a card that also provokes an attack of opportunity, it will get you hit only once, as I understand, because you are doing one action (and it is the action that provoke attacks of opportunity) with several effects. There was also a question in comments whether you need to pay resource costs of the card you play. I decided to add the clarification to the review, since a friend of mine also asked the same: yes, you do.Tthe rules specifically say: "to play a card, an investigator must pay the card's resource cost and meet any applicable play restrictions and conditions." Sometimes cards allow to avoid paying the costs, then the wording "put into play" is used instead of simply "to play". Here are some examples: Sleight of Hand, Flare
chrome · 3
4. Playing an event ‘under your control’ means you play the event (as if it had been from your hand). Anything that effects the person who plays it affects you. Any tests that happen - you make. 5. Correct. — Death by Chocolate · 12
I'm still unclear as to whether you need to pay the resource cost. Normally cards will specify "paying its cost" when that's the case, but the wording on this card doesn't say anything about that. I suppose it's reasonable to assume that you would need to pay, but it's ambiguous. — Sassenach · 50
They don’t always. Three cards have it as reminder text in parenthesis and italics, but at least as many don’t, as paying costs is an assumed part of ‘playing a card.‘ — Death by Chocolate · 12
you do need to pay all card costs, including resource ones. It's absolutely clear, because the rules specifically say: "To play a card, an investigator must pay the card's resource cost and meet any applicable play restrictions and conditions." Sometimes cards allow to avoid paying the card costs, then the wording "put into play" is used instead of simply "to play". Here are some examples: <a href="03029">Sleight of Hand</a>, <a href="02115">Flare</a>. — chrome · 3